Increased Employment Statistics for People with Disabilities

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The numbers are in for 2016 and it’s good news. More Americans with disabilities are working today than at any time in the past.

Canadian participation rates are increasing too but we do not yet have statistical ratings currently used by the US government. We should have one, but a ranking system would jolt those Provinces who lag behind to do more around inclusion.

Anecdotally however we know more Canadians with disabilities are at work in real jobs for real pay compared to only two years ago. The attitudes of many employers have changed. Some large corporations such as TD Bank, RBC, Sodexo, Loblaws and others see inclusion as part of their cultural strategy. This is what we have been preaching for years and the results show evidence of a shift in thinking.

SMB’s are also jumping on the inclusion bandwagon. Some “get it” and see the obvious economic benefits while others see the disability community as a huge untapped labour force in areas where few workers exist. There are many such areas across Canada where labour shortages are dire.

There are, however, too many top brands in Canada who are either still in the infancy stage of Inclusion or it’s not on their radar at all. Some of those names would surprise you, as every Canadian knows them. It is difficult to imagine that in 2018 this would be the case.  Those companies are in trouble; brand culture that isn’t inclusive is a cultural journey to oblivion. Those brands will cease to exist unless they embrace real inclusion.  Some may scoff at such a comment but let me be clear, any corporation not embracing inclusion of people with disabilities in real jobs for real pay, not including workers with disabilities in management and executive roles and failing to include individuals with disabilities on board of director positions will struggle to remain competitive and for some, will fail completely.

While we wait for the Federal Accessibility Act, Ontario continues down its path of creating one good piece of legislation that helps people with disabilities only to enact another piece of legislation that does the exact opposite. Perhaps that’s a lack of communication or it’s a case of pandering for votes, I will leave that up to you to decide.

Meanwhile the US is reporting remarkable numbers. I have been hard on the US government for a long time now so I am happy to provide props where props are due. The employment gap in the US is narrowing (dis/non dis employment) meaning some States are becoming more inclusive.

340,000 more Americans with disabilities found work in 2016. That’s up from 87,000 in 2015. This is transformational change. Companies like JP Morgan Chase, Pepsi, SAP, EY, UPS, IBM, Starbucks and Walgreens lead the way in various forms with Walgreens of course being the clear champion of inclusion world wide. Others are coming along such as Microsoft, Cisco and McDonalds, slowly at the moment but gathering momentum.

States and Provinces can’t make jobs appear but each jurisdiction is responsible for ensuring that employment for workers with disabilities is made easier by removing systemic barriers most often found within government itself.

North Dakota once again leads the way with 54% of its citizens of working age with disabilities, in the workforce. Once again however West Virginia is last with only 27.4% of its people with disabilities working.  Overall the employment gap is 35% vs 77% for non-disabled. Still awful but better that previous years.

Rounding out the top ten States with employment at over 40% for the disability community is South Dakota, Minnesota, Alaska, Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, Iowa and Kansas.

Much of this change has come about because of the hard work of organizations such as Employment first and school to work transitional programs. These programs of transition and training are seeing a 78% success rate in landing real jobs for real pay. There are now 300 such programs in 46 States.

Although this is transformational, there are still intersectional gaps that the US has to address such as race. African Americans with disabilities have a much lower employment rate at only 27% and Hispanics also are lower than average. Canada faces its own intersectional issue, our indigenous people with disabilities have employment prospects much lower than the norm.

See the report for yourself and see where your State ranked. If you are at the top, well done and keep pushing. If your State has work to do, be DIRECT, DARING and BOLD.

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