To Disclose or Not to Disclose

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A question I am asked quite often from the disability community is “should I disclose my disability” and if so, when is it best to do so?

It is important to disclose at some part of the onboarding journey otherwise the employer may not realize that any difficulty one might have with a particular task when related to a disability. With 70% of disabilities being non-visible, most employers will not know that a new hire may be disabled.

It is also important to know how to disclose. One must be an expert on their disability and own it. See it as a benefit to who they are, show that they see the world in a different way and can complete tasks with a different approach; often better than someone without a disability.

Studies show that self-identifying early in the hiring process leads to a lack of continuation in the game. Stating a disability on a cover letter or on a resume is simply a red flag for the recruiter who has not met with the candidate yet and sees little by way of contribution. The recruiter most often is buying into age-old stereotypes, myths and misperceptions. A French study in 2014 showed that self-identifying in the first interview gave the candidate a 7% chance of a second interview. According to caseinterview.com the average percentage of candidates with no known disability who get a second interview is at least twice that number and often higher.

Therefore early disclosure leads to poor outcomes.

Those who have obvious disabilities have no choice other than to discuss their disability at the beginning of the process and this is where it is important to know how to disclose. First, the candidate should do their homework and study the company they are applying at. Do they have a track record of inclusion?  Are they known to be an accessible business? Do they market to the disability community? Is their advertising inclusive and so on? When in the interview it is important to discuss this. Secondly a candidate must go to the interview armed with all the positive statistics that make up the business case for hiring a worker who has a disability: likely to have higher productivity, stay longer (5 times longer) , work in a more safe manner, lower absenteeism, greater innovative thinking and much more. All candidates have to sell themselves in a job interview but those with disabilities have that added responsibility to sell the benefits of hiring them over someone who does not have a disability.

Is that fair? No, but when done properly it can be rather empowering. The recruiter can learn a lot in a 20-minute interview.

What must be avoided is a conversation about what the candidate cannot do. A recruiter who is new to inclusion doesn’t know what they don’t know so may ask questions in a negative view. It is up to the candidate to turn this around, perhaps responding with a piece of data such as “did you know absenteeism for workers with disabilities is 85% lower than workers without”

So where do I suggest a candidate self identify and disclose? As late as possible and preferably once an offer of employment has been made

Be direct. Be daring. Be bold.

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