The Increasing Demographic of Disability

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According to London’s Financial Times, the global impact of disability on humanity is growing rapidly.  Estimates from the International Labour Organization (ILO) suggests 1B people worldwide currently have disabilities, 800M of those being of working age. Four fifths of those are in developing nations with 200M being adults with significant disabilities or difficulties in functioning.

These numbers are about to explode. People are living longer and chronic conditions such as Diabetes are on the rise. As well conditions developed at birth along with mental health disabilities discovered later in life either increase or become more difficult to manage with age.

The UN backed global burden on disease study uses a calculation of years lived with disability that shows three quarters of medical conditions would benefit from rehabilitation support. This is limited even in developed nations.

My good friend, Susan Scott Parker CEO of the UK based International Forum on Disability says one of three adults aged 50-65 will have a disability. “It’s simply an inevitable part of what it means to be human.”

There are many organizations around the world doing remarkable work to ensure those belonging to or joining this growing demographic are cared for with dignity, are represented in society and are ensuring barriers are broken down. Although technology has made significant changes to the lives of those with disabilities, technology also creates its own barriers.

The one area where a break through has still not materialized is in employment. Accessibility has increased exponentially over the past ten years yet even employers who create fully accessible workplaces are still largely reluctant to staff those workplaces with workers who have disabilities. An example of systemic barriers around technology is with online recruitment practices.

An employer would not invite a wheelchair user to a job interview on the second floor of a building with no elevator and expect the candidate to climb the stairs. This would be outrageous however it is equally outrageous that an employer uses outdated, inaccessible online recruitment software that blocks those with low vision, dyslexia and other types of disabilities. In fact one of the most popular online recruitment software programs out there today blocks those with the aforementioned disabilities. This is humiliating but it also prevents a recruiter from hiring some potentially amazing talent.

The U.S. Department of Labour announced its 25th straight month of increased labour force increases for Americans with disabilities in April however, America is still not back to its pre-2008, pre-recession participation rates. Cause for celebration and alarm at the same time.

As the demographic increases, employment is going to become a critical factor in ensuring this massive minority group live full contributive lives. Our Governments must set the tone and provide significant guidance to the private sector. The global economic burden will be unsustainable if the current lack of workplace participation remains as it is today as we quickly move to a disability rate of one in five.

Note : Mark Wafer will co-moderate a leaders debate on accessibility and inclusion at Ryerson University May 16th along with Canadian Press reporter Michelle MacQuigge.  This event will be live streamed, please check Ryerson website for details.

Marketplace Gains for Workers with Disabilities

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For the 24th consecutive month we are seeing an increase in marketplace attachment for Americans with disabilities. The gains made by people with disabilities continues to outpace the gains made by people without disabilities according to the Institute on Disability.

The Bureau of Labour Statistics Jobs Report released on April 6th showed an increase in the ratio of working-age people with disabilities from 28.6% in March 2017 to 31.7% in March 2018, an increase of 10.8%. The BLS uses an employment to population ratio that reflects the percentage of people who are working relative to the total population.

According to the Kessler Foundation, the labour force participation rate for working-age people with disabilities increased from 32.2% in march 2017 to 34.8% in March 2018, an increase of 7.7%.   Kessler uses a different set of parameters to achieve its numbers. Director of Employment and Disability at Kessler, John O’Neill, indicates that with this upward trend, people with disabilities are closing in on their pre-Great Recession employment levels.

It is important to keep in mind that these statistics should only be used as a comparison to show improvement year over year. Statistics do not include those who have no marketplace attachment. In the United States that number is in the millions, perhaps even tens of millions. Therefore it is widely known and assumed that the real participation rate is much lower. For example, in March 2018, among workers ages 16-64, the 4.9m workers with disabilities represented 3.4% of the total 145m workers in the United States despite the rate of disability approaching 20%.

Here in Ontario we do not track these numbers. Anecdotally however we are experiencing a similar increase in the number of people with disabilities finding jobs. Despite the Provincial Governments unwise role out of Bill 148, the new Employment Standards Act, more people with disabilities are finding work. For each worker with disabilities who lost their job as a result of Bill 148, up to two workers are finding a job. The Ontario Disability Employment Network (ODEN) reports that there is a move away from the retail sector for entry-level jobs for people with disabilities and a move into manufacturing jobs.

The shift from retail to manufacturing is important. Retail has always been the “go to” for agencies who represent individuals with intellectual disabilities. 70% of such workers find themselves in minimum wage jobs at Quick service restaurants and retail shops. With a shift to manufacturing jobs, workers are receiving higher wages and benefits.

As well we are seeing emerging corporate leadership with Dare Foods and the Canadian National Exhibition hiring large numbers of workers with disabilities. A commitment to be an inclusive champion. Although new to the game, both companies join the ranks of those who lead in this space.

Kessler Foundations O’Neill added, “the strengthening economy underscores the value of diversity In the workplace. As hiring increases, preparing for the workplace is more important than ever for people with disabilities”.

Now more than ever Be Direct, Be Daring, Be Bold

#HowToPissOffDisabledPeople

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#HowToPissOffDisabledPeople is the latest social media trend

Online technology and social media level the playing field for people with disabilities. Not only does social media provide much needed awareness of the difficulties and barriers #PWD face every day but social media also provide platforms on which #peoplewithdisabilities speak out about their issues of discrimination, accessibility, and inclusion.

Social media is the place to share ideas within the disability community and give voice to all that is too often drowned out in the world. This week I discovered #HowToPissOffDisabledPeople, a fantastic hashtag that draws attention to issues of discrimination against people with disabilities.

This hashtag has been trending over the past five days and has given many people with disabilities an opportunity to talk about how they have been victims of on-going discrimination. What’s even better about this hashtag is that thousands of non-disabled tweeters have retweeted the hashtag suggesting other non-disabled social media followers read the tweets.

Although not at the level of hashtags such as #StormyDaniels or #MarchForOurLives, the #HowToPissOffDisabledPeople hashtag is trending well. Here are a few examples of tweets with this hashtag:-

“Complete strangers in public say can I pray with/for you?”

“You have considered sterilization, right?”

“Have you tried eating vegan?” (Suggested as a cure for paraplegia.)

“OMG, if what happened to you happened to me I would kill myself.”

“You’re partner must be a saint.”

“You’re too young to be disabled.”

“You’re so brave doing that perfectly normal ordinary thing. What an inspiration.”

And my personal favourite . . . “have you tried rubbing castor oil clockwise on your stomach during the waxing quarter moon? It helped my sister’s husband’s brother’s hamster’s mother who has a condition completely unrelated to yours.”

Sometimes what people with disabilities need most is a powerful sense of humour.

If you are on Twitter please check out the hashtag #HowToPissOffDisabledPeople to see for yourself how unconscious bias plays out in the non-disabled community. You’ll find me @markwafer.

Be direct. Be daring. Be bold.

 

Dr. Stephen Hawking and Ableism – How the Passing of a Genius Opened a Floodgate of Well-meaning but Poorly Worded Tributes

 

ABLEISM – defined as discrimination in favour of so called typically abled people , it is discrimination and social prejudice against people with disabilities. Ableism characterizes persons as defined by their disabilities and inferior to the non-disabled

My disability bullshit meter is today at Defcon One.

Oh what a week it has been. Actress Gal Gadot started it off with a well meaning but awful tribute to Stephen Hawking by tweeting the following.

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This was followed up by many tweets by the disability community explaining to Gadot that her words were unacceptable.

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This in turn brought out the self-righteous and sanctimonious on twitter who defended Gadot but also by suggestion Ableism is simply ones self being sensitive and/or being too politically correct

Nothing could be further from the truth.

Some well known advocate/activists had to shut down their feed for the day due to the outrageous push back on social media.

Hawking was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis at the age of 21, a motor neuron disease that eventually required him to use a wheelchair . Several disability rights activists used twitter and other forms of social media to explain why Gadot’s comments were so problematic noting that disabilities shouldn’t be viewed as life inhibiting circumstances that people will be freed of upon death.

However, as the days went on it got worse, with comments on social media from Hollywood, star athletes and other celebrities posting comments such  as “trapped in his body but his mind was free”, “his genius almost normalizes his disability”, “a genius despite his disability” .

Even main stream media took the bait and acted poorly with one British tabloid having perhaps the most shocking front page headline of all managing to get every piece of ableism possible into one headline.

To be clear, Dr. Hawking’s wheelchair provided him with freedom. The chair WAS his freedom. His disability was, of course, part of who he was but it did not define him.

Millions of wheelchair users around the world saw these headlines and comments on social media and, without question, their hearts sank as they saw and felt, once again, that they are relegated to a sub-section of humankind, not worthy and a crushing assault on their confidence and self worth. Imagine being told that the only way they could be free was to die.

If you don’t get it, you’re privileged. If anyone in the non-disabled community disagrees with ableism, they are privileged.

People with disabilities are not “confined” to wheelchairs, they are not “bound” to wheelchairs, they just happen to have a disability that requires them to be a wheelchair user. The wheelchair is totally liberating.

For the same reason I am not hearing impaired, I am deaf. The only time I am impaired is after seven beers.

Ableism, now you know.

Godspeed Dr. Hawking and let’s hope there isn’t only a stairway to heaven.

Be DIRECT, be DARING,  be BOLD.

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To Disclose or Not to Disclose

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A question I am asked quite often from the disability community is “should I disclose my disability” and if so, when is it best to do so?

It is important to disclose at some part of the onboarding journey otherwise the employer may not realize that any difficulty one might have with a particular task when related to a disability. With 70% of disabilities being non-visible, most employers will not know that a new hire may be disabled.

It is also important to know how to disclose. One must be an expert on their disability and own it. See it as a benefit to who they are, show that they see the world in a different way and can complete tasks with a different approach; often better than someone without a disability.

Studies show that self-identifying early in the hiring process leads to a lack of continuation in the game. Stating a disability on a cover letter or on a resume is simply a red flag for the recruiter who has not met with the candidate yet and sees little by way of contribution. The recruiter most often is buying into age-old stereotypes, myths and misperceptions. A French study in 2014 showed that self-identifying in the first interview gave the candidate a 7% chance of a second interview. According to caseinterview.com the average percentage of candidates with no known disability who get a second interview is at least twice that number and often higher.

Therefore early disclosure leads to poor outcomes.

Those who have obvious disabilities have no choice other than to discuss their disability at the beginning of the process and this is where it is important to know how to disclose. First, the candidate should do their homework and study the company they are applying at. Do they have a track record of inclusion?  Are they known to be an accessible business? Do they market to the disability community? Is their advertising inclusive and so on? When in the interview it is important to discuss this. Secondly a candidate must go to the interview armed with all the positive statistics that make up the business case for hiring a worker who has a disability: likely to have higher productivity, stay longer (5 times longer) , work in a more safe manner, lower absenteeism, greater innovative thinking and much more. All candidates have to sell themselves in a job interview but those with disabilities have that added responsibility to sell the benefits of hiring them over someone who does not have a disability.

Is that fair? No, but when done properly it can be rather empowering. The recruiter can learn a lot in a 20-minute interview.

What must be avoided is a conversation about what the candidate cannot do. A recruiter who is new to inclusion doesn’t know what they don’t know so may ask questions in a negative view. It is up to the candidate to turn this around, perhaps responding with a piece of data such as “did you know absenteeism for workers with disabilities is 85% lower than workers without”

So where do I suggest a candidate self identify and disclose? As late as possible and preferably once an offer of employment has been made

Be direct. Be daring. Be bold.

Why the Word “Disability” Matters

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People First Language is described by Wikipedia as ‘a type of linguistic description in English to avoid perceived and subconscious dehumanizations when discussing people with disabilities’. It is now an accepted type of disability etiquette.

Person First Language has become the norm.  Instead of saying “disabled person”, the supposed correct lexicon is “person with a disability”. Instead of “deaf guy”, it’s a “man with a hearing disability”.

Problem is, that’s all bullshit.

Person First Language was created by those who do not have disabilities. It was created by workers in the disability field, employees of agencies, and indeed, moms and dads who thought it would be a better way to describe their children’s disability. As a result however they removed a vitally important piece of that individuals psyche. It also made that individual less. It reduced the individuals true identity.

Few of us with disabilities actually identify only as disabled. We are doctors, lawyers, retail workers, politicians and more. However we have a disability and although the disability doesn’t define us it does define an important part of who we are.

Person First Language morphed into something even more insidious. Changing the word “disability” into a myriad of cringe-worthy descriptions. “Differently abled” and my personal favourite, “handi-capable”. These descriptions serve one purpose, to help the non-disabled individual feel better about themselves while talking about those with disabilities

The word “disabled” isn’t a negative description. It is in fact an extremely important word that allows a disabled person to own their disability, it creates confidence and is damn empowering.

Those with disabilities often lack confidence and self esteem. That’s natural. However we make this worse and devalue that individuals worth by changing how we describe them. We also risk the fact that labels stick. Describing someone as handi-capable diminishes that Individuals worth and value to a very low level. You can’t own it and feel empowered when someone describes you with that term. You can’t be seen as a contributor to society with that descriptive terminology.

Person First Language is also responsible for some disability groups needless journey into bizarre descriptive terms within their own disability group. For example, in the deaf community (I am prepared for some backlash here) we have big “D” deaf, small “d” deaf, “oral deaf” , “late deafened” “hard of hearing ” and more.

There is nothing inherently wrong with those descriptions on the condition that the individuals align themselves with it. I find the term “hard of hearing ” ridiculous.  Terry Fox wasn’t hard of walking. He was disabled and he damn well owned it.

I identify as deaf but many in the deaf community argue with me that I am hard of hearing. This is where the problem lies. It’s their insecurity around wording, not mine. I can’t hear shit, I’m deaf plain and simple.

The time has come to take back what is rightfully ours, the word disabled. We identify as we see fit and those who prefer People First Language should carry on. Those without disabilities need to respect an individual’s decision on how they wish to be identified.

For me, I’m deaf and I am disabled. Feels mighty empowering

Say the word and say it loud

Be direct, be daring and be BOLD.

Increased Employment Statistics for People with Disabilities

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The numbers are in for 2016 and it’s good news. More Americans with disabilities are working today than at any time in the past.

Canadian participation rates are increasing too but we do not yet have statistical ratings currently used by the US government. We should have one, but a ranking system would jolt those Provinces who lag behind to do more around inclusion.

Anecdotally however we know more Canadians with disabilities are at work in real jobs for real pay compared to only two years ago. The attitudes of many employers have changed. Some large corporations such as TD Bank, RBC, Sodexo, Loblaws and others see inclusion as part of their cultural strategy. This is what we have been preaching for years and the results show evidence of a shift in thinking.

SMB’s are also jumping on the inclusion bandwagon. Some “get it” and see the obvious economic benefits while others see the disability community as a huge untapped labour force in areas where few workers exist. There are many such areas across Canada where labour shortages are dire.

There are, however, too many top brands in Canada who are either still in the infancy stage of Inclusion or it’s not on their radar at all. Some of those names would surprise you, as every Canadian knows them. It is difficult to imagine that in 2018 this would be the case.  Those companies are in trouble; brand culture that isn’t inclusive is a cultural journey to oblivion. Those brands will cease to exist unless they embrace real inclusion.  Some may scoff at such a comment but let me be clear, any corporation not embracing inclusion of people with disabilities in real jobs for real pay, not including workers with disabilities in management and executive roles and failing to include individuals with disabilities on board of director positions will struggle to remain competitive and for some, will fail completely.

While we wait for the Federal Accessibility Act, Ontario continues down its path of creating one good piece of legislation that helps people with disabilities only to enact another piece of legislation that does the exact opposite. Perhaps that’s a lack of communication or it’s a case of pandering for votes, I will leave that up to you to decide.

Meanwhile the US is reporting remarkable numbers. I have been hard on the US government for a long time now so I am happy to provide props where props are due. The employment gap in the US is narrowing (dis/non dis employment) meaning some States are becoming more inclusive.

340,000 more Americans with disabilities found work in 2016. That’s up from 87,000 in 2015. This is transformational change. Companies like JP Morgan Chase, Pepsi, SAP, EY, UPS, IBM, Starbucks and Walgreens lead the way in various forms with Walgreens of course being the clear champion of inclusion world wide. Others are coming along such as Microsoft, Cisco and McDonalds, slowly at the moment but gathering momentum.

States and Provinces can’t make jobs appear but each jurisdiction is responsible for ensuring that employment for workers with disabilities is made easier by removing systemic barriers most often found within government itself.

North Dakota once again leads the way with 54% of its citizens of working age with disabilities, in the workforce. Once again however West Virginia is last with only 27.4% of its people with disabilities working.  Overall the employment gap is 35% vs 77% for non-disabled. Still awful but better that previous years.

Rounding out the top ten States with employment at over 40% for the disability community is South Dakota, Minnesota, Alaska, Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, Iowa and Kansas.

Much of this change has come about because of the hard work of organizations such as Employment first and school to work transitional programs. These programs of transition and training are seeing a 78% success rate in landing real jobs for real pay. There are now 300 such programs in 46 States.

Although this is transformational, there are still intersectional gaps that the US has to address such as race. African Americans with disabilities have a much lower employment rate at only 27% and Hispanics also are lower than average. Canada faces its own intersectional issue, our indigenous people with disabilities have employment prospects much lower than the norm.

See the report for yourself and see where your State ranked. If you are at the top, well done and keep pushing. If your State has work to do, be DIRECT, DARING and BOLD.